Thursday, February 26, 2015

Can You Mike Money From Trash?

It’s a dirty job but some company has got to do it. The feature that is great about the garbage collection business that they are monopolies. Once they have their foot in the door, they are on easy street. You don't have a choice of waste collection companies; you get the service from the company that has contracted with your city or you take your trash to the dump. The way these companies grow is by raising rates, which they negotiate with the cities, and by acquisitions of either publicly traded companies or small private companies. One example is Waste Connections Inc. (WCN), based in The Woodlands, Texas, has a network of 148 solid waste collection operations. The stock trades at 25 times trailing earnings and 20 times forward earnings. Quarterly earnings were up an incredible 22.9% on an 8.3% rise in revenues. It also pays a decent dividend of 1.1%. Last October, the company raised its dividend by 13%. Republic Services Inc. (RSG), based in Phoenix, Arizona, has 336 collection operations. It has a trailing price to earnings ratio of 27 and forward P/E of 19. Unfortunately, earnings take 79% for the latest quarter on a slight increase in revenues. The yield is a healthy 2.8%. Of course, there is Waste Management, Inc. (WM), With a trailing and forward P/E of 19. It also has a yield of 2.8%. If you like interesting stock lasts like this, check out many of the free stock lists at WallStreetNewsNetwork.com.

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Stocks Going Ex Dividend the First Week of March


Here is our latest update on the stock trading technique called 'Buying Dividends,' also commonly referred to as 'Dividend Capture.' This is the process of buying stocks before the ex dividend date and selling the stock shortly after the ex date at about the same price, yet still being entitled to the dividend. This technique generally works only in bull markets, and can work in flat or choppy markets, but you need to avoid the technique during bear markets.

In order to be entitled to the dividend, you have to buy the stock before the ex-dividend date, and you can't sell the stock until after the ex date. The actual dividend may not be paid for another few weeks. WallStreetNewsNetwork.com has compiled a downloadable and sortable list of the stocks going ex dividend in the near future. The list contains many dividend paying companies, lots with market caps over $500 million, and yields over 2%. Here are a few examples showing the stock symbol, the ex-dividend date, and the yield.


Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. AJG 3/2/2015 3.1%
Avery Dennison AVY 3/2/2015 2.6%
Cinemark Holdings CNK 3/2/2015 2.4%
Coach, Inc. COH 3/4/2015 3.1%
CenturyLink Inc. CTL 3/4/2015 5.8%
Flushing Financial Corp FFIC 3/4/2015 3.1%
Flowers Foods FLO 3/4/2015 2.4%
Gannett GCI 3/4/2015 2.3%
Genuine Parts GPC 3/4/2015 2.6%
International Game Technology IGT 3/4/2015 2.5%
Iron Mountain IRM 3/4/2015 5.2%
Johnson Controls JCI 3/4/2015 2.1%
Kellogg Co. K 3/4/2015 3.1%
Kimberly-Clark KMB 3/4/2015 3.2%

The additional ex-dividend stocks can be found at wsnn.com. (If you have been to the website before, and the latest link doesn't show up, you may have to empty your cache.) If you like dividend stocks, you should check out some of the other high yield stock lists at WallStreetNewsNetwork.com or WSNN.com. Most of the lists are free. 
Dividend definitions:

Declaration date: the day that the company declares that there is going to be an upcoming dividend.

Ex-dividend date: the day on which if you buy the stock, you would not be entitled to that particular dividend; or the first day on which a shareholder can sell the shares and still be entitled to the dividend.

Monthly Dividend Stock List

Record date: the day when you must be on the company's books as a shareholder to receive the dividend. The ex-dividend date is normally set for stocks at two business days before the record date.

Payment date: the day on which the dividend payment is actually made, which can be as long at two months after the ex date.

Book now available: Buying Dividends Revised and Expanded

Book now available: Stock Market Trivia Makes a Great Gift!

Don't forget to reconfirm the ex-dividend date with the company before implementing this technique.

Disclosure: Author did not own any of the above at the time the article was written.

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Stocks Going Ex Dividend the Fourth Week of February


Here is our latest update on the stock trading technique called 'Buying Dividends,' also commonly referred to as 'Dividend Capture.' This is the process of buying stocks before the ex dividend date and selling the stock shortly after the ex date at about the same price, yet still being entitled to the dividend. This technique generally works only in bull markets, and can work in flat or choppy markets, but you need to avoid the technique during bear markets.

In order to be entitled to the dividend, you have to buy the stock before the ex-dividend date, and you can't sell the stock until after the ex date. The actual dividend may not be paid for another few weeks. WallStreetNewsNetwork.com has compiled a downloadable and sortable list of the stocks going ex dividend in the near future. The list contains many dividend paying companies, lots with market caps over $500 million, and yields over 2%. Here are a few examples showing the stock symbol, the ex-dividend date, and the yield.


Bluerock Residential Growth REIT, Inc. BRG 2/23/2015 8.6%
BGC Partners, Inc. BGCA 2/25/2015 7.5%
Bank of Hawaii BOH 2/25/2015 3.2%
Brookfield Canada Office Properties BOXC 2/25/2015 5.3%
Cabot Corp CBT 2/25/2015 2.1%
Crane Co. CR 2/25/2015 2.2%
Corning Inc. GLW 2/25/2015 1.9%
Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory RMCF 2/25/2015 3.4%

The additional ex-dividend stocks can be found at wsnn.com. (If you have been to the website before, and the latest link doesn't show up, you may have to empty your cache.) If you like dividend stocks, you should check out some of the other high yield stock lists at WallStreetNewsNetwork.com or WSNN.com. Most of the lists are free. 
Dividend definitions:

Declaration date: the day that the company declares that there is going to be an upcoming dividend.

Ex-dividend date: the day on which if you buy the stock, you would not be entitled to that particular dividend; or the first day on which a shareholder can sell the shares and still be entitled to the dividend.

Monthly Dividend Stock List

Record date: the day when you must be on the company's books as a shareholder to receive the dividend. The ex-dividend date is normally set for stocks at two business days before the record date.

Payment date: the day on which the dividend payment is actually made, which can be as long at two months after the ex date.

Book now available: Buying Dividends Revised and Expanded

Book now available: Stock Market Trivia Makes a Great Gift!

Don't forget to reconfirm the ex-dividend date with the company before implementing this technique.

Disclosure: Author did not own any of the above at the time the article was written.

Monday, February 16, 2015

The End of Employer-Provided Health Insurance: Why It's Good for You, Your Family and Your Company

The book, The End of Employer-Provided Health Insurance: Why It's Good for You, Your Family and Your Company, by Paul Zane Pilzer and Rick Lindquist, is based on the premise that the Affordable Care Act, also more commonly known as Obamacare, is good for America, both individuals and businesses.

The book describes how companies are now moving towards a defined contribution model of health benefits, as opposed to a defined benefit model. The authors state that this change will allow employees and business owners to save as much as 60% on health insurance. They explain that health insurance provided by an employer is a financial risk to the employees, and is far more expensive than individual health insurance, even with the same doctors and the same hospitals. In addition, with a subsidized individual health policy, your premiums don't go up unless your income does.

What I like about the book is that it is the first that finally explains Obamacare in a clear and concise way, with lots of examples and specific information. In addition, Appendix A shows the health insurance rates for every state in the union for all levels of coverage, whether employer provided or individual, for both family and single. The section for startups and small businesses is very useful.

One concern is the mention of the fact that the benefits are available due to the "trillions of dollars in federal subsidies to consumers" and "hundreds of billions of dollars in federal subsidies to insurance carriers." The authors really don't say where those trillions of dollars come from. It doesn't come out of thin air. Let's say it is only two trillion in subsidies. Divide that by 320,206,000 Americans, and it works out to a subsidy cost of $6,246 for every man, woman, and child. Where does that money come from?  These subsidies come from the backs of American taxpayers in the form of increased taxes or increased federal debt or both. Either way, an indirect but severe cost to the American taxpayer.

Anyway, if you want to get a complete understanding of how Obamacare works, and how immediate health insurance costs can be reduced, you should read The End of Employer-Provided Health Insurance: Why It's Good for You, Your Family and Your Company.

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