Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Finance Books on Sale as Low as 99 Cents (Richard Branson, Warren Buffett, Rockefeller)

The following business and finance Kindle books are currently on sale at Amazon (AMZN). If you are interested in any of these books, you should order them as soon as possible, because often these sales only last for just a couple days.
Smarter Faster Better
By Charles Duhigg
Explores the science of productivity, and why managing how you think is more important than what you think
Price: $2.99 discounted from: $12.99
The Retirement Rescue Plan
By Melissa Phipps
Guide to security when you leave the workforce.
Price: $0.99  discounted from: $7.19
Losing My Virginity
By Richard Branson
Richard Branson chronicles his road to success in this autobiography
Price: $1.99  discounted from: $14.99
Remote
By Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson
The benefits of remote workplaces
Price: $1.99  discounted from: $13.99
Customers for Life
By Carl Sewell and Paul B. Brown
How to keep your customers coming back.
Price: $1.99  discounted from: $14.99
John D. Rockefeller on Making Money
By John D. Rockefeller
How to make a fortune in business.
Price: $7.99  discounted from: $9.99
My Warren Buffett Bible
By Robert L. Bloch
Quotes from the world’s most successful investor.
Price: $9.99  discounted from: $11.73
Stick with It
By Sean Young
How to create lasting change
Price: $0.99  discounted from: $15.99
How to Wow
By Frances Cole Jones
Polish your skills and hone your confidence in any situation.
Price: $9.99  discounted from: $11.06
Be Obsessed or Be Average
By Grant Cardone
The secret to massive success: obsession.
Price: $1.99  discounted from: $16.99
Workplace Genie
By Natalie Canavor and Susan Dowell
How to handle challenging people at work s that will give you a leg up in your career.
Price: $1.99  discounted from: $14.91

Stocks Going Ex Dividend the Fourth Week of October

Here is our latest update on the stock trading technique called ‘Buying Dividends,’ also commonly referred to as ‘Dividend Capture.’ This is the process of buying stocks before the ex dividend date and selling the stock shortly after the ex date at about the same price, yet still being entitled to the dividend. This technique generally works only in bull markets, and can work in flat or choppy markets, but you need to avoid the technique during bear markets.
In order to be entitled to the dividend, you have to buy the stock before the ex-dividend date, and you can’t sell the stock until after the ex date. The actual dividend may not be paid for another few weeks.
WallStreetNewsNetwork.com has compiled a downloadable and sortable list of the stocks going ex dividend in the near future. The list contains many dividend paying companies, lots with market caps over $500 million, and yields over 2%. Here are a few examples showing the stock symbol, the ex-dividend date, the quarterly dividend amount, and annual yield.










CVS Health Corporation (CVS) 10/23/2017 0.5 2.65%
Clorox Company (CLX) 10/24/2017 0.84 2.46%
Lowe's Companies, Inc. (LOW) 10/24/2017 0.41 1.80%
Royal Bank Of Canada (RY) 10/25/2017 0.724 3.25%
Williams-Sonoma, Inc. (WSM) 10/26/2017 0.39 3.00%


The additional ex-dividend stocks can be found here at wstnn.com. (If you have been to the website before, and the latest link doesn’t show up, you may have to empty your cache.) If you like dividend stocks, you should check out some of the other high yield stock lists at WallStreetNewsNetwork.com or WStNN.com. Most of the lists are free.

Dividend definitions:
Declaration date: the day that the company declares that there is going to be an upcoming dividend.
Ex-dividend date: the day on which if you buy the stock, you would not be entitled to that particular dividend; or the first day on which a shareholder can sell the shares and still be entitled to the dividend.
Monthly Dividend Stock List

Record date: the day when you must be on the company’s books as a shareholder to receive the dividend. The ex-dividend date is normally set for stocks at two business days before the record date.
Payment date: the day on which the dividend payment is actually made, which can be as long at two months after the ex date.


Monday, October 09, 2017

Buying Stocks Below Their Cash Value

Do you think a return of 56% over a period of less than two years is pretty good? How about 115%? Those are the actual returns of stocks that you could have bought less than two years ago that were selling for less than the cash per share.

What is cash per share?

In simple terms, cash per share is the amount of cash the company has sitting in the banks divided by the number of shares. So if the company has little or no debt, and you can buy the stock below the amount of cash per share, you are getting a bargain. If the company went out of business today and all the inventory and equipment and all other assets were totally worthless, you would still make a profit because the cash you would receive for each share would exceed the price you paid.

Real Life Examples of Stocks that were Selling Below Cash

Let's get back to those real life examples mentioned in the first paragraph of this article. MEI Pharma (MEIP) is an oncology company focused on the clinical development of therapeutics to treat cancer. Back in November of 2015, the stock was selling for 1.64, yet it had cash per share of 1.70, providing a discount to investors of 3.5% to the cash. Since that time, the stock has risen to 2.57, a gain of 56.71%. Not a bad investment for less than a couple years. Then there is Support.com (SPRT), a provider of cloud-based software and services. In November 2015, it was trading at 1.09, with cash per share of 1.25, a 12.8% discount to cash. The stock is now trading for 2.35, a spectacular gain of 115.6%.

But what about companies that have a reverse split?

This is a great question. Let's look at bebe (BEBE), the women's clothing company, over the same time frame as the previously mentioned stocks. It was trading at a 22.6% discount to cash. Back then, the stock was trading at 0.41 per share, but the company had a 10 for 1 reverse split in December of 2016.

What this meant was that for every 10 shares that you own prior to the split, you would now only have one share. So the effective cost basis of the original purchase price would be 4.10. The stock is now at 5.48, giving investors a 33.66% return. (To clarify this, assume you buy 1,000 shares at 41 cents, for a total cost of $410. The reverse split takes place, you now only have 100 shares at 5.48 or $548 total value, a gain of over 33%.)

Does the stock need to trade at a huge discount to make money?

Absolutely not. Here is a great example. GenCorp Industries (GENC) traded at a 0.1% discount to cash, actually one penny below the cash per share. The stock has gone from 10.18 to 17.95 a share, a very decent gain. But that's not all. The stock declared a 3 for 2 stock split (what I call a "good stock split") in July of 2016, which was effectively a 50% stock dividend. In other words, one and a half shares for every one share that you own. So the true gain on this stock from November 2015 is an incredible 76.33%.

Risks of Buying Below Cash Stocks

  • Possibility that the company is what we used to call the "walking dead" and what we now call "zombies". These are companies that will continue to stumble along, never really grow but never go out of business, and they'll just hold on to all their cash
  • Possibility that management may spend the company's cash like a drunken sailor.
  • For biotech companies, the possibility that they will burn all their cash before they come out with an FDA approved drug

Advantages of Buying Below Cash Stocks

  • Provides a downside cushion for the stock price
  • In the event of bankruptcy or liquidation, excellent chance of getting back more money than your investment
  • Provides the company with a solid balance sheet -they can easily make payroll, buy new equipment, make acquisitions, without having to borrow

But the stock market is trading at lofty levels

Are there still stocks that can be purchased for less than cash per share? Yes, there are actually over 20 different companies with stock prices below cash per share with little or no debt. Here is just one example. The Rubicon Project (RUBI), is a Los Angeles based technology and software company. The stock recently closed at 3.70 per share, but has cash per share of 6.47, providing a discount to cash of 42.81%.

The company is currently generating negative earnings, but has a very favorable price to sales ratio of 0.78 (a number below 1 is good, a number above 2 is not so good), and an excellent price to book of 0.65. Revenues have increased every year since 2012 and for the latest fiscal year, revenues jumped by about 12%. The company is debt free.

So what are some other companies selling below cash?

WStNN.com has come up with a list of almost two dozen companies that are currently trading below their cash per share, and have little or no debt. If you are interested in getting this list, just subscribe to our newsletter. We will be emailing the list in an Excel format to all subscribers who have subscribed by 11:59 pm on Friday, October 13. The list, which will be sent out the following day, will provide the following:
  • Company name
  • Stock ticker symbol
  • Country where the company is based
  • Price per share
  • Cash per share
  • Percentage discount to cash
  • Debt, if any
However, you must subscribe by October 13 in order to get this free list. The reason why we have this short timeframe is that the information may become stale a month from now, and we want you to get timely information.

What's the Cost to Subscribe? Nothing!!!

We charge nothing for our WStNN/Stockerblog newsletter. It is sent out between two to four times a month, so we won't spam you, we won't overload your mailbox every day, and we don't sell or give away our list. (Some clown actually called me about a revenue split for selling newsletters, and he said all I had to do was give him my email list and they would take care of everything. Yeah right!)

How to Get the Below Cash Stock List for Free

Just fill in the box below. We don't ask for a credit card number, we don't need your phone number, and you don't have to give us your street address.  Once you submit, you will need to check your email account for a confirmation. You may need to click on the link confirming that you want to subscribe. By the way, if you are already a subscriber, you don't need to re-subscribe. Just remember, new subscribers need to subscribe by 11:59 pm on Friday, October 13. The list will be sent out the following day.

Thanks for subscribing and happy investing!

Friday, October 06, 2017

Stocks Going Ex Dividend the Second Week of October

Here is our latest update on the stock trading technique called ‘Buying Dividends,’ also commonly referred to as ‘Dividend Capture.’ This is the process of buying stocks before the ex dividend date and selling the stock shortly after the ex date at about the same price, yet still being entitled to the dividend. This technique generally works only in bull markets, and can work in flat or choppy markets, but you need to avoid the technique during bear markets.
In order to be entitled to the dividend, you have to buy the stock before the ex-dividend date, and you can’t sell the stock until after the ex date. The actual dividend may not be paid for another few weeks.
WallStreetNewsNetwork.com has compiled a downloadable and sortable list of the stocks going ex dividend in the near future. The list contains many dividend paying companies, lots with market caps over $500 million, and yields over 2%. Here are a few examples showing the stock symbol, the ex-dividend date, the quarterly dividend amount, and annual yield.





Oracle Corporation (ORCL) 10/10/2017 0.19 1.39%
Abbott Laboratories (ABT) 10/12/2017 0.265 1.92%
Foot Locker, Inc. (FL) 10/12/2017 0.31 3.40%
Owens Corning Inc (OC) 10/13/2017 0.2 1.00%






The additional ex-dividend stocks can be found here at wstnn.com. (If you have been to the website before, and the latest link doesn’t show up, you may have to empty your cache.) If you like dividend stocks, you should check out some of the other high yield stock lists at WallStreetNewsNetwork.com or WStNN.com. Most of the lists are free.

Dividend definitions:
Declaration date: the day that the company declares that there is going to be an upcoming dividend.
Ex-dividend date: the day on which if you buy the stock, you would not be entitled to that particular dividend; or the first day on which a shareholder can sell the shares and still be entitled to the dividend.
Monthly Dividend Stock List

Record date: the day when you must be on the company’s books as a shareholder to receive the dividend. The ex-dividend date is normally set for stocks at two business days before the record date.
Payment date: the day on which the dividend payment is actually made, which can be as long at two months after the ex date.