Thursday, July 30, 2009

Stocks Going Ex Dividend during the Second Week of August

The stock trading technique called 'Buying Dividends' is becoming more and more popular. It is the process of buying stocks before the ex dividend date and selling the stock shortly after the ex date at about the same price, yet still being entitled to the dividend. This technique generally works only in bull markets.

When you buy dividends, there are many stocks in many different sectors to choose from. In order to be entitled to the dividend, you have to buy the stock before the ex-dividend date, and you can't sell the stock until after the ex date. The actual dividend may not be paid for another few weeks. WallStreetNewsNetwork has compiled a free downloadable and sortable Excel list of the stocks going ex dividend during the second week of August. They came up with many companies all with market caps over $500 million. Here are a couple examples showing the stock symbol, the ex-dividend date and the yield:

Duke Energy Corporation DUK ex div date: 8/12/09 market cap: $19.1B yield: 6.4%

Eli Lilly & Co. LLY ex div date: 8/12/09 market cap: $38.8B yield: 5.7%

The rest of the ex-dividend stocks can be found at wsnn.com. If you like dividend stocks, you should check out the high yield utility stocks and the Monthly Dividend Stocks at WallStreetNewsNetwork.com or WSNN.com. For more details on dividend definitions, check out definitions of dividend dates. Don't forget to reconfirm the ex-dividend date with the company before implementing this technique.

Author doesn't own any of the above.

By Stockerblog.com

Chocolate Bars Need to Shrink

In the United Kingdom, chocolate bars will need to start shrinking, and not just due to inflationary factors or to save the manufacturers money. The British Food Standards Agency is requesting that chocolate-based bars, be reduced in size to a maximum of 50 grams, versus the 58 grams of Mars bars, as an example. They also want regular chocolate bars to be no bigger than 40 grams. This has come about in order to reduce obesity in England. Who knows how this will affect Hershey (HSY), Cadbury plc (CBY), and Nestle (NSRGY.PK)? Will consumers buy two candy bars instead of one, in order to make up for the loss of the chocolate kick?

Tuesday, July 28, 2009

New 'Secret' Ingredient in Coca Cola Drink

Coca Cola (KO) is coming out with a new drink called Vio, which comes out in four flavors. And can you guess what the special ingredient is? Milk!

Coca Cola trades on the NYSE.

Guest Article: 5 Strategies for Investing Properly, Cautiously, and Intelligently in This Bear Market

5 Strategies for Investing Properly, Cautiously, and Intelligently in This Bear Market
By Stephen T. McClellan
Author of Full of Bull (Updated Edition): Unscramble Wall Street Doubletalk to Protect and Build Your Portfolio

This is a perilous period in the stock market; a deceptive bear market that disguises its downward drift. Beware of misleading Wall Street doubletalk, as it tempts investors into this dangerous bear market. The Street tends to discourage and even hinder proper investing. Its advice is unreliable and often contradictory. Professional insiders know better than to take the Street literally. To be an astute investor you must fathom the puzzling, strange, ambiguous ways of Wall Street that it would prefer to keep secret. Be a cautious, realistic, long-term investor. Preserving capital is paramount -- the most important investment strategy that I emphasize in Full of Bull. Entering this bear market is a risky strategy.

1. Keep Short Term Influences at Bay
The Street wants you to pay attention and generate commission trades on a regular basis, to create business. That is why it regularly alters stock opinion ratings and is always so optimistic. Brokers market stocks, analysts recommend stocks. They are not objective advisors. The investment world evolves around the exceedingly short-term trading mentality of Wall Street. So too the media. TV stock market programs need you to tune in everyday, every hour, to collect advertising dollars. The message had better be new and different every time you switch it on, to keep you interested. It is all about drama, ideas, news, and color to engage you. Companies and executives are similarly short-term focused. Their emphasis is on current quarter earnings results and managing Street and investor expectations low enough to "beat" the consensus. Keep these subjective short-term influences at bay. Put them in perspective. Pay some attention but do not let them be a consuming distraction.
2. Steer around confusing Wall Street gibberish.
A Wall Street Journal headline recently declared, "AIG Corrects . . . " Given the Street's eternal optimism and favorable bias, it uses the term "correction" to indicate a stock-price decline. I always viewed this as absurd since the Street never labels a stock-price rise as a "mistake." Thus, I assumed the article pertained to the dive in the AIG stock. What a surprise. It was referring instead to a 24% rally in the shares and described "what analysts said was a partial correction from the stock's sharp decline in the first four days of the week." This is an ultimate example of the baffling Street terminology and guidance. You need to cut through this malarkey, correctly interpret Wall Street commentary and opinions, and avoid the pitfalls of inappropriate research guidance. Step back, think, ponder, observe, and take an intelligent approach to investing.
3. Understand that being wrong is part of the process.
A Wall Street pioneer and renowned investment consultant, Peter L. Bernstein, who passed away recently, lived through the boom and bust of the 1920s and had a 70-year career as a Street portfolio manager. When asked what was the most important lesson gleaned during his seven decade run, he was emphatic -- the idea that " You can figure this thing out. You have to understand that being wrong is part of the [investing] process." His approach was always to consider the consequences if the investment decision is wrong. His strategy was to take big risks only with small amounts of capital, and only take small risks with big amounts of money. Investors must avoid incurring whopping losses. Have the discipline to reassess if a holding declines by some 20%. The economic and stock market outlooks are ominous. Investors should take a guarded stance.
4. Know that bear markets regularly tempt investors to wade back in.
During bear markets, each time there is a precipitous drop, it is followed by a modest recovery, masking as the beginning of a new bull market. Do not be deceived into believing that such bear market rallies are the outset of a new bull phase. Alan Abelson pointed out in Barron's that the new buzz word on the Street was "exit strategy," as the market faded following the March-April bear market rally. His view is that investors could have avoided this necessity with better foresight, that is, with an appropriate "entry strategy."
5. Beware of dead-cat bounces.
Even a dead cat will bounce if it falls far and fast enough. Any stock or market that drops similarly will experience a rebound at some point. After single-digit declines four quarters in a row, the stock market nosedive worsened to double-digits in the fourth quarter last year and again in the first quarter earlier this year. So a spring back in the second quarter was a reasonable occurrence. But it was hardly the beginning of a sustained recovery. The market could still easily plummet by at least 10% as the bear market endures. A reasoned, conservative investment approach precludes jumping into stocks given the hazardous conditions. However, this is not the counsel you will hear from Wall Street.
Use Wall Street's information and research content, not its conclusions or recommendations. Do not be fooled by the Street. Successful, long-term investors focus keenly on investment entrance strategy and conservative management of capital. It is not what you make, it is what you keep. The Street pays little heed to risk, the possibility of permanent loss of capital, in the pursuit of big gains. But an intelligent investor should seek consistency rather than outsize gains, and always pay attention to protection of capital, especially in these precarious times.
©2009 Stephen T. McClellan, author of Full of Bull (Updated Edition): Unscramble Wall Street Doubletalk to Protect and Build Your Portfolio


Author Bio
Stephen T. McClellan, author of Full of Bull (Updated Edition): Unscramble Wall Street Doubletalk to Protect and Build Your Portfolio, was a Wall Street investment analyst for 32 years, covering high-tech stocks as a supervisory analyst. He was a First Vice President at Merrill Lynch for 18 years until 2003, and ranked on the annual Institutional Investor All-America Research Team 19 consecutive times, The Wall Street Journal poll for 7 years, and has a place in the Journal's Hall of Fame. From 1977 to 1985, he was a Vice President at Salomon Brothers and before that held a similar position at Spencer Trask for 6 years. Before commencing his Wall Street career, he was an industry analyst with the U.S. Department of Commerce. From 1964 to 1967, the author served as an operations officer aboard the USS Suffolk County (LST-1173) in the U.S. Navy.
Mr. McClellan has a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation, is a member of the New York CFA Society and the CFA Institute, was President of the New York Computer Industry Analyst Group, and was President and Founder of the Software/Services Analyst Group. He has made television appearances on Bloomberg TV, FoxBusiness News, CBS, CNN MoneyLine, CNBC, and Wall Street Week. He has conducted several radio interviews on such programs as Bob Brinker's Moneytalk and given presentations to numerous organizations, at conferences, and to companies. Mr. McClellan has published articles in the Financial Times, The New York Times, Forbes, and other publications. His MBA in Finance is from George Washington University and his BA is from Syracuse University.

Reprinted with the permission of the publicist.

Americans Prefer Fords

In a recent survey by Rasmussen Reports, it was reported that 46% of Americans would prefer to buy a car from Ford (F) since it didn't take government bailout funds. Ford trades on the New York Stock Exchange.

Monday, July 27, 2009

Southwest Airlines Flight Grounded by Coffee Maker Smells

A Southwest Airlines (LUV) flight was grounded by an electrical smell, which turned out to be coming from the coffee maker. Southwest trades on the New York Stock Exchange.

Spotify Going After the iPhone

Spotify, the Swedish music streaming service, is planning on being major competition for the Apple (AAPL) iPhone, as it is planning on coming out with its first mobile application. Spotify has been called the "iTunes killer".

US Turns Off Ticker in Cuba

The United States has turned off a five foot high news ticker (not stock ticker) at the American diplomatic mission in downtown Havana, Cuba. This was an attempt by the Americans to improve relations with Cuba.

Thursday, July 23, 2009

Stocks Going Ex Dividend during the First Week of August

The stock trading technique called 'Buying Dividends' is becoming more and more popular. It is the process of buying stocks before the ex dividend date and selling the stock shortly after the ex date at about the same price, yet still being entitled to the dividend. This technique generally works only in bull markets.

When you buy dividends, there are many stocks in many different sectors to choose from. In order to be entitled to the dividend, you have to buy the stock before the ex-dividend date, and you can't sell the stock until after the ex date. The actual dividend may not be paid for another few weeks. WallStreetNewsNetwork has compiled a free downloadable and sortable Excel list of the stocks going ex dividend during the first week of August. They came up with many companies all with market caps over $500 million. Here are a couple examples showing the stock symbol, the ex-dividend date and the yield:

Alexander & Baldwin, Inc. (ALEX) ex div date: 8/4/09 market cap: $1.1B yield: 4.6%

Bank of Montreal (BMO) ex div date: 8/5/09 market cap: $24.2B yield: 5.7%

The rest of the ex-dividend stocks can be found at wsnn.com. If you like dividend stocks, you should check out the high yield utility stocks and the Monthly Dividend Stocks at WallStreetNewsNetwork.com or WSNN.com. For more details on dividend definitions, check out definitions of dividend dates. Don't forget to reconfirm the ex-dividend date with the company before implementing this technique.

Author doesn't own any of the above.

By Stockerblog.com

Guest Article: Technical Tips from Dan Gramza

Technical Tips from Dan Gramza

Hello everyone, this is Dan Gramza and welcome to Gramza Market Studies Technical Tip.

Well today we're going to be talking about selling rallies. Now what does it mean when people say, "sell the rally" when you want to get into a trade? Or they sell a pull back? Or you hear things like, "The Trend Is Your Friend?"

Well we're going to explore this here in just a minute. I want to show you the technique and I want to show you some examples of how these markets behave in those settings.

I want to show you an example, but before I can talk to you too much about this example I need to define a few things for you. First candles... the approach that I use with Japanese candle charts, and that is what you're looking at here, is not the standard approach. So from my perspective, I don't focus on patterns, I focus on behavior. If we see a green candle that represents buying, that means that the closing price is higher than the open. If you see a red box that represents selling it means that the closing price is below that opening price. If you see a white line on top that's called a shadow, I think that represents selling. If you see a white line on the bottom that represents buying. Now with that in mind, the sizes of the bodies and the shadows tell us about the degree of buying or selling.

Now let's talk about this set-up here...

To get the rest of the tips, please visit the link below and WATCH me!
http://www.ino.com/info/
36/CD3111/&dp=0&l=0&campaignid=9

Sunday, July 19, 2009

California May Use Marijuana to Close Their Budget Gap

The use of medical marijuana is expanding dramatically in California. Now with the state's budget going to pot, the decriminalization and taxation of pot is being closely looked at.

Saturday, July 18, 2009

How Bad Is It for California Workers? Watch Out for the Ghouls!

Everyone knows the economy is bad in California, with an unemployment rate at a record 11.6%. But how bad is it if you work for the state or do business with the state? If you have an account with Chase Bank (formerly Washington Mutual), you are out of luck. If you call their 800 number, you will get a message that says "Although Chase temporarily accepted State of California Registered Warrants as a convenience to our customers, we will no longer accept them after July 10."

A representative at Wells Fargo reported that they will accept a check if it is pink, but not if it is green. I wonder how they can tell the color of an automatic deposit.

I then called Bank of America, and after going through a series of phone prompts, and waiting on hold for about five minutes, I was told that they will no longer accept paycheck warrants.

I am now waiting for the "ghouls" to come out and start offering California employees 75 cents on the dollar for their paychecks, and when the economy in California recovers (which it will in some way or another), the ghouls will make a 33% return on their money.

Friday, July 17, 2009

Stocks Going Ex Dividend during the Last Week of July

If you want to try the stock trading technique called 'Buying Dividends,' which is the process of buying stocks before the ex dividend date and selling the stock shortly after the ex date at about the same price, yet still being entitled to the dividend, there are many stocks to choose from. This technique generally works only in bull markets.

When you buy dividends, there are many stocks in many different sectors to choose from. In order to be entitled to the dividend, you have to buy the stock before the ex-dividend date, and you can't sell the stock until after the ex date. The actual dividend may not be paid for another few weeks. WallStreetNewsNetwork has compiled a free downloadable and sortable Excel list of the stocks going ex dividend during the last week of July. They came up with many companies all with market caps over $500 million. Here are a couple examples showing the stock symbol, the ex-dividend date and the yield:

Tanger Factory Outlet Centers Inc. (SKT) ex div date: 7/28/09 market cap: $951.1M yield: 5.2%

NiSource Inc. (NI) ex div date: 7/29/09 market cap: $3.2B yield: 7.9%

The rest of the ex-dividend stocks can be found at wsnn.com. If you like dividend stocks, you should check out the high yield utility stocks and the Monthly Dividend Stocks at WallStreetNewsNetwork.com or WSNN.com. For more details on dividend definitions, check out definitions of dividend dates. Don't forget to reconfirm the ex-dividend date with the company before implementing this technique.

Author doesn't own any of the above.

By Stockerblog.com

Monday, July 13, 2009

What Financial Magazine is Up for Sale?

One of the major publishing houses is selling off one of the top American business magazines. Can you guess what magazine it is? Check it out at billionaireslife.com.

Saturday, July 11, 2009

Ten Countries with Inflation Rates over 25%

According to the CIA World Factbook, the following countries have annual inflation rates in excess of 25%. The inflation rates are as of 2008 estimates by the CIA.

Zimbabwe 11,200,000% The country had an official estimated high inflation rate of 231,000,000% in July 2008 according to the country's Central Statistical Office. This is the country that issued the $100 trillion dollar note.

Ethiopia 41% They have one of the fastest growing economies in the world, according to The Economist.

Venezuela 31% Petroleum accounts for around 80% of the country's exports.

Guinea 30% The country has up to one-half of the world's reserves of bauxite.

Saudi Arabia 28% Ninety percent of export profits come from the oil industry and oil amounts to about 45% of Saudi Arabia's gross domestic product.

Mongolia 28% The Mongolian Stock Exchange is the world's smallest stock exchange by market capitalization.

Iran 28%

Burma 27.3%

Sao Tome and Principe 27%

Seychelles 25.8%


By Stockerblog.com

Friday, July 10, 2009

Top Five Box Office Hit Movies and the Stocks that Benefit

The top five box office hit motion pictures over July 4 weekend generated substantial sales. The 'stacation' is becoming more popular during this recession, with people going to the movies, going out to local restaurants, and day trips. And this has helped the motion picture industry.

Number one was Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen, starring Shia Labeouf and Megan Fox, distributed by Paramount Pictures. Paramount is owned by Viacom (VIA) (VIAB) which trades on the New York Stock Exchange. The movie appeared in 4,234 theaters and generated a gross of $42,320,877 for the weekend and $293,355,885 altogether since the movie came out.

Second on the list was Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs, distributed by 20th Century Fox, which is owned by News Corporation (NWS-A), another NYSE stock. The film generated $41,690,382 for the weekend, appearing in around 4,100 theaters.

Public Enemies was in third place, a Universal Pictures movie, which brought in $25,271,675 for the weekend. Universal is owned by the conglomerate General Electric (GE).

In fourth position was The Proposal, a Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures film, which took in $12,857,482. Disney Studios is part of The Walt Disney Company (DIS).

Last but not least was The Hangover, distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, a subsidiary of Time Warner Inc. (TWX). They generated $11,268,413 in total ticket sales.

Don't forget to check out the celebrity stock indexes including the Heidi Klum Stock Index, the Eva Longoria Stock Index, the Angelina Jolie Stock Index, the Jessica Alba Stock Index, the Nicole Kidman Stock Index, the Freida Pinto Stock Index, and the Supermodels Stock Indices.

Author owns DIS and TWX.

By Stockerblog.com

Wall Street Joke of the Day

Jay Leno: "I took public transportation to get here tonight, General Motors."

How Much Would You Pay for Lunch With Warren Buffett?

So how much would you pay for a lunch with famous billionaire Warren Buffett? $1000? $10,000? $100,000? Or even $500,000? You would have been outbid. A Canadian paid a LOT of money for this opportunity, described at billionaireslife.com.

Stocks Going Ex Dividend during the Last Half of July

If you want to try the stock trading technique called 'Buying Dividends,' which is the process of buying stocks before the ex dividend date and selling the stock shortly after the ex date at about the same price, yet still being entitled to the dividend, there are many stocks to choose from. This technique generally works only in bull markets.

When you buy dividends, there are many stocks in many different sectors to choose from. In order to be entitled to the dividend, you have to buy the stock before the ex-dividend date, and you can't sell the stock until after the ex date. The actual dividend may not be paid for another few weeks. WallStreetNewsNetwork has compiled a free downloadable and sortable Excel list of the stocks going ex dividend during the last half of July. They came up with many companies all with market caps over $500 million. Here are a couple examples showing the stock symbol, the ex-dividend date and the yield:

Foot Locker, Inc. (FL) ex div date: 7/15/09 market cap: $1.5B yield: 6.2%

RPM International Inc. (RPM) ex div date: 7/15/09 market cap: $1.7B yield: 5.9%

Caterpillar Inc. (CAT) ex div date: 7/16/09 market cap: $18.4B yield: 5.5%

The rest of the ex-dividend stocks can be found at wsnn.com. If you like dividend stocks, you should check out the high yield utility stocks and the Monthly Dividend Stocks at WallStreetNewsNetwork.com or WSNN.com. For more details on dividend definitions, check out definitions of dividend dates. Don't forget to reconfirm the ex-dividend date with the company before implementing this technique.

Author doesn't own any of the above.

By Stockerblog.com

Guest Article: How to Improve your ETF Trading Instantly!

How trade triangles can help you trade in the ETF markets

Today we will be looking at our trade triangle technology and how it can help you time the ETF markets successfully.

In this short video I will show you exactly how to use our trade triangle technology in the ETF markets.

http://www.ino.com/info/
401/CD3111/&dp=0&l=0&campaignid=3


You can watch this video with my compliments and there is no registration requirements. I would love to get your feedback about this video on our blog.

All the best,

Adam Hewison
President, INO.com
Co-creator, MarketClub

The Latest Advanced Fee Fraud Scam Email Now Involves Madoff

I receive scam emails every day, but this is the first one I've seen involving Bernie Madoff, actually his wife. Here it is exactly as written except with the sender's name removed.

Good day,

Contact Mr. xxxx Directly via His Email Below.

I am xxxx, I represent a top company executive in the United States,Ruth
Madoff wife of Bernard Madoff the disgraced money manager and CEO of Madoff
involved in a USD$50 Billion Dollar scam in theUnited States, his business victims
includes major Oil Companies,Construction Companies, Banks and top figures
around the United States etc.

I have a very sensitive and private brief from this top executive wife "Ruth
Madoff" to ask for your partnership to re-profile funds over US
$25,000,000.00.You will be paid 40% of this fund for your proposed "Management
Fees", to assist her to re-profile these funds appropriately to a new
investment location if I am able to reach terms with you.

Considering whats presently going on in the family now I will give the detail
immediately i hear from you.

Thursday, July 09, 2009

AIG Paying $ Millions More in Bonuses

Here we go again. AIG is asking the government for permission to pay millions of dollars more in bonuses to top company executives. When will it stop? This company has received over $100 billion in US Government, I mean US taxpayers bailouts.

Author owns AIG.

Guest Article: Why Managers Should Care About Employee Loyalty

Why Managers Should Care About Employee Loyalty
By Timothy Keiningham and Lerzan Aksoy,
Authors of Why Loyalty Matters: The Groundbreaking Approach to Rediscovering Happiness, Meaning and Lasting Fulfillment in Your Life and Work

The landmark Ipsos Loyalty Study, the largest study of loyalty ever conducted, found less than 30 percent of US employees say they are loyal to their company. Only about 25 percent of US employees think their employer has earned their loyalty.

The long-term success of any company depends heavily upon the quality and loyalty of its people. Few corporate executives would disagree with this idea conceptually. But it is also true that most treat the economic value of employees in enhancing customer relationships and company profits as "soft" numbers, unlike the "hard" numbers they use to manage their operations, such as the cost of labor.

The problem with this is that when the going gets tough, managers focus on the hard numbers. And the reality is that at some point every company will go through tough times. That is the nature of business cycles.

The result is that today we are overwhelmed with downsizings and restructurings. Layoffs make the front pages of our newspapers regularly. And while Wall Street often rewards layoffs by treating them as a sign that management is serious about getting a company's financial house in order, the reality is quite different. Most organizations that downsize fail to realize any long-term cost savings or efficiencies, which necessitates even more restructurings and layoffs.

Disloyalty Is a Two-Way Street

Although the cost benefits tend to be mirages, the corresponding pain to customers and employees is all too real. Research using the American Customer Satisfaction Index found that those firms that engaged in substantial downsizing experienced large declines in customer satisfaction. Unfortunately for those firms, the index has proven to be a good predictor of future earnings. The study's authors note that "the current trend toward downsizing in US firms may increase productivity in the short term, but the downsized firms' future financial performance will suffer if repeat business is dependent on labor-intensive customized service."

The impact on the organization's culture is also severe. Downsizings result in a rumor-filled paranoia. When Coca-Cola instituted a restructuring that resulted in the loss of thousands of jobs, the company became so awash in far-fetched stories that executives were forced to take the unusual step of intervening to quash them.

Worse still, employees that remain often find themselves jaded. It isn't hard to find employees who feel exactly like Dan after his company's layoffs in Mitchell Lee Marks' Charging Back Up the Hill:

"There is no loyalty here; no one is going the extra mile after this. Two years ago, we worked sixty-five-hour weeks. People were willing to do it, because it was a great place to work and we were doing something that mattered. . . . From here on in, it's just a job for me. I'll put in my forty hours and that's it."

Let's be clear. No CEO relishes the thought of layoffs. It means that their companies are floundering. Furthermore, history has shown us that the pain often outweighs any long-term financial gains.

If companies are going to grow their way out of difficult times (and excel in good times), they need two things: (1) for their customers to stick with them, and (2) to improve their productivity. But this only happens through an organization of committed, loyal employees.

Finding the Link between Employee Loyalty and Profitability

Benjamin Schneider, professor emeritus at the University of Maryland, has shown conclusively that the employee's loyalty-related attitudes precede a firm's financial and market performance. And there is a much greater payoff in working on improving the human factor than people think. Researchers at University of Pennsylvania found that spending 10 percent of a company's revenue on capital improvements increased productivity by 3.9 percent. But investing that same amount in developing the employee capital more than doubles that amount, to a whopping 8.5 percent.

It is one thing to believe that employee loyalty results in positive financial outcomes, it is quite another to quantify those outcomes. But if we are going to be able to resist our natural inclinations to focus exclusively on the short-term in difficult times, then we need to get very good at understanding what the real implications to the long-term health of our business is of employee loyalty.

The place to begin at your company is by asking, "How loyal are our employees really?" Doing this requires that you meaningfully solicit feedback from all employees (management included). And you have to be willing to ask tough questions. For example:

* How do our managers' relationship styles impact the organization's service climate and employee loyalty?
* Does the company provide the necessary tools and training for employees to perform their jobs well?
* Is a commitment to serve customers rewarded and encouraged by the organization?
* Does the company demonstrate that it deserves the loyalty of its employees?

There will of course be other dimensions that are of concern for your particular organization or industry. The key is to identify those few, vital dimensions that are most essential for your success. Once you have identified these dimensions, you must measure them in a clear, objective, and rigorous manner.

Once you know where you stand vis-à-vis employee loyalty, next you need to tie this information to the performance drivers of your business. Typically, these come down to four things: productivity, employee turnover, customer loyalty, and revenue.

The ability to statistically link each of these measures to employee loyalty is relatively straightforward. The key is to aggregate employee data into groups that meaningfully link to turnover, customer loyalty, and revenue. For example, a retail chain might find store level analysis to be the most relevant unit, since customer loyalty and revenue are tracked at this level, and stores typically have semi-independent management.

The correlation between employee-loyalty-related attitudes and business outcomes is always meaningful from a practical, managerially relevant perspective, so it is worth the effort. In fact, a large-scale study conducted by researchers Harter, Schmidt, and Hayes presented compelling evidence that employee-loyalty-related attitudes were positively linked to each of these performance drivers. Furthermore, managers can learn a great deal by studying the performance of their most loyal business units, and how this is influenced by managers' own relationship styles.

Despite the ability to pull this information together to gain invaluable managerial insight, most companies do nothing (or next to nothing) in this regard. The number one problem in making the link isn't that this information doesn't exist. It is simply a lack of management will to pull the data contained in various departments together.

Why? We don't want to hear bad news. And without question, this kind of company internal examination always yields bad news. The reality is that employees are only as loyal to the company as they believe the company is loyal to them. This is true almost everywhere in the world! So in the end, building an organization of committed, loyalty employees ultimately comes down to demonstrating to employees that the company deserves their loyalty.

©2009 Timothy Keiningham and Lerzan Aksoy, authors of Why Loyalty Matters: The Groundbreaking Approach to Rediscovering Happiness, Meaning and Lasting Fulfillment in Your Life and Work

Reprinted with the permission of the publicist.

Author Bios
Timothy Keiningham is a world-renowned authority in the field of loyalty measurement and management, and Global Chief Strategy Officer and Executive Vice President for Ipsos Loyalty, one of the world’s largest business research organizations. Lerzan Aksoy is an acclaimed expert in the science of loyal management, and Associate Professor of Marketing at Fordham University. They are coauthors of a new book, with Luke Williams, entitled Why Loyalty Matters: The Groundbreaking Approach to Rediscovering Happiness, Meaning and Lasting Fulfillment in Your Life and Work (BenBella Books, 2009, www.whyloyaltymatters.com ), and creators LoyaltyAdvisor (www.LoyaltyAdvisor.com), a web-based tool that analyzes your loyalty across multiple dimensions proven to link to your success. LoyaltyAdvisor is the product of a global effort, the most comprehensive study of loyalty ever conducted.

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

More Strangeness in the Bernie Madoff Case

One of Howard Stern's groupies, Ivy Silberstein, AKA "Ivy Supersonic," was cited for recording the sentencing hearing of convicted Ponzi-scheme swindler Bernard Madoff. She was able to get her recorder back but had to have the recording erased.

Check Out the Golf Handicaps for Top CEO's

If you have ever wondered how well top CEOs do on the golf course, there is a web site where you can look it up. You can even check out their recent golf games. Here are a few examples of some handicaps:

Scott McNealy, the Chairman of Sun Microsystems (JAVA) 3.0

Charles R. Schwab, founder and CEO of the Charles Schwab Corporation (SCHW) 6.9

Donald Trump, Chairman and CEO of the Trump Organization, founder of Trump Entertainment Resorts, Inc. (TRMPQ) 1.9

T. Boone Pickens, chairman of the hedge fund BP Capital Management 10.4

Warren Buffett, CEO of Berkshire Hathaway (BRKA) (BRKB) 20.8

This info can be found at GHIN.com.

Michael Jackson's Will

Are you curious about where Michael Jackson has left his money? You can check out his last will and testament here.

Cyber Attackers Hit the NYSE and NASDAQ

Apparently, the cyber attackers that hit the the White House, the Pentagon, the National Security Agency, Homeland Security Department, State Department, the Treasury Department, Federal Trade Commission and Secret Service, have also attacked the New York Stock Exchange (NYX) and NASDAQ OMX Group, Inc. (NDAQ). The NYSE and NASDAQ seemed to have survived the attacks OK, but some governmental agencies are still experiencing residual effects.

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

Air New Zealand Uses Nude Fight Attendants

Air New Zealand (ANZFF.PK) (AIR.NZ), which trades on both the New Zealand Stock Exchange and occasionally on the Pink Sheets, utilizes flight attendants with no clothes on, other than body paint, to explain safety procedure for their airline safety video. They did this to get passenger's attention. The video can be viewed on YouTube.

Apply for a Job by Texting

The mobile phone content provider, Teimlo, which is based in Britain, is looking for someone in their marketing department. However, there is a catch, they just take job applications by text messages.

Book Review: Outliers - The Story of Success

I recently finished reading Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell, and I found it to be one of the most fascinating books I've read in a long time. It is all about what it takes to be a success.

And if you think you know what that is, you would probably be wrong. For example, to be a successful hockey player, you need to be born in the right month. Want to be a successful rock musician? Practice 10,000 hours. Want to be a billionaire software geek? Practice 10,000 hours.

If you were born between 1952 and 1958, you have an outstanding chance of becoming very wealthy. Want to avoid plane crashes? Make sure that your pilot is not from one of the five countries that Gladwell lists. He goes into great detail, written in an interesting way, why all these correlations (and a lot of other correlations) are true. He even discusses what many consider to be the politically incorrect topic of why Asians do well in math.

If you are looking to find out about the fascinating causes or triggers of success, pick up a copy of Outliers: The Story of Success.

By Stockerblog.com

Friday, July 03, 2009

Stocks Going Ex Dividend during the Second Week of July

If you want to try the stock trading technique called 'Buying Dividends,' which is the process of buying stocks before the ex dividend date and selling the stock shortly after the ex date at about the same price, yet still being entitled to the dividend, there are many stocks to choose from. This technique generally works only in bull markets.

When you buy dividends, there are many stocks in many different sectors to choose from. In order to be entitled to the dividend, you have to buy the stock before the ex-dividend date, and you can't sell the stock until after the ex date. The actual dividend may not be paid for another few weeks. WallStreetNewsNetwork has compiled a free downloadable and sortable Excel list of the stocks going ex dividend during the first half of July. They came up with many companies all with market caps over $500 million. Here are a couple examples showing the stock symbol, the ex-dividend date and the yield:

Progress Energy, Inc. PGN ex-div date 7/8/09 market cap $10.3B yield 6.6%

Teekay Corporation TK ex-div date 7/8/09 market cap $1.4B yield 6.6%

The rest of the ex-dividend stocks can be found at wsnn.com. If you like dividend stocks, you should check out the high yield utility stocks and the Monthly Dividend Stocks at WallStreetNewsNetwork.com or WSNN.com. For more details on dividend definitions, check out definitions of dividend dates. Don't forget to reconfirm the ex-dividend date with the company before implementing this technique.

Author doesn't own any of the above.

By Stockerblog.com

Wednesday, July 01, 2009

Guest Article: Apple VS RIMM…who’s on top?

A little over six weeks ago I produced a video on the relationship between Apple and RIMM.

I called it the “Battle Of The Tech Titans,” and in this short video I explained that we felt the relationship was changing between Apple, Inc. (NASDAQ_AAPL) and Research In Motion, Ldt (NASDAQ_RIMM). I detailed a strategy of approaching this market using a trading strategy that I call “pair trading” or “trading pairs.”

What trading pairs means is that you buy one market while going short the other market in the same sector. Now Apple and RIMM are battling it out right now in the smart phone sector. It remains to be seen who is going to be triumphant in this battle but it would appear as though Apple may have the upper hand based on its very successful “APP” store.

Trading pairs is what many professionals do when they are unsure as to the direction of the general market but feel pretty comfortable in their analysis of the relationship between two stocks. I hope you find the video both informative and educational.

The video is free to watch and there is no need to register. I would love to get your feedback about this video on our blog.

All the best,

Adam Hewison
President, INO.com

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